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Azores Wind Power and Microgrid a Successful Team

by Nicholas Brown

Faial is one of 9 islands in the Azores, which is a Portuguese archipelago between Europe and North America.

This island currently relies on a 17 MW microgrid to supply about 15,000 people with power.

As part of a goal to increase the island’s electricity production by about 25% — without having too much of an impact on the environment or the island’s tourism appeal –  5 wind turbines were recently installed there.

However, due to the fact that Faial is on a microgrid (a very small, localized power grid), grid stability was a concern, so the local utility company, Electricidade dos Açores (EDA), decided to also use a system provided by ABB that controls the wind turbines and the grid’s oil-fired power plants in such a way that grid stability is constantly maintained, while minimizing the fuel consumption of the oil-fired generators.

This is an important function as the intermittency associated with wind energy can cause frequency and voltage fluctuations that can destabilize the microgrid, and in extreme cases even lead to power disruptions and blackouts, noted Claudio Facchin, head of ABB’s Power Systems division.

ABB adds:

The integration of wind energy combined with ABB’s innovative solution will save an estimated 3.5 million liters of fuel per year enough for a car to travel about 2,300 times around the world.

This has the potential to reduce annual carbon dioxide emissions by around 9,400 tons.

Keep up with all the hottest wind energy news on our wind energy channel or via our wind energy newsletter, and keep up with all the hottest microgrid news on our microgrid channel. Check out more ABB news on our ABB channel.

This article, Microgrid Control System Helps Faial Integrate Wind Power, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Nicholas BrownNicholas Brown has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, geography, and much more. My website is: Kompulsa.

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Our energy comes from many sources, including coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewables.

As nonrenewable sources such as coal diminish due to market forces and consumer preference, the need for renewable energy sources grows.

Some U.S. states satisfy their growing renewable energy needs with wind, solar and hydropower.

Wind: Texas has the capacity to generate 18,500 megawatts hours of electricity through wind, and expects to add another 5,000 megawatts of wind generation capacity from facilities under construction.

Solar: California’s solar farms and small-scale solar power systems have 14,000 megawatts of solar power generating capacity.

Hydroelectric: Washington state hydroelectric power produces two-thirds of its net electricity.

Information courtesy of ChooseEnergy.com

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