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Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Canada: Up, Down, and Sideways

Premier of Alberta, Rachel Notley has recently unveiled Alberta’s Climate Change Task Force recommendations and as a result, greenhouse gas emissions in Canada are expected to fall dramatically by 2030 as Alberta phases-out all coal-fired power plants. – Ed

Canada Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Canada to 2015
GHG’s in Canada to 2015. Image courtesy of National Post.

Alberta’s greenhouse gas emissions have shot up since 1990. Could the province learn from Ontario?

Monika Warzecha | November 25, 2015 6:52 PM ET
More from Monika Warzecha | @monikawarzecha

Though Alberta and Ontario make up the lion’s share of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, the provinces have been on entirely different trajectories over the last decade. The two economic powerhouses accounted for about 60 per cent of Canada’s total emissions of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2013, according to Environment Canada.…

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Planetary Energy Graphic

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U.S. Energy Subsidies

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U.S. Jobs by Energy Type

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Energy Water Useage

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U.S. Energy Rates by State

Click here to enlarge the image and see the data for each state in the U.S.A.

Our energy comes from many sources, including coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewables.

As nonrenewable sources such as coal diminish due to market forces and consumer preference, the need for renewable energy sources grows.

Some U.S. states satisfy their growing renewable energy needs with wind, solar and hydropower.

Wind: Texas has the capacity to generate 18,500 megawatts hours of electricity through wind, and expects to add another 5,000 megawatts of wind generation capacity from facilities under construction.

Solar: California’s solar farms and small-scale solar power systems have 14,000 megawatts of solar power generating capacity.

Hydroelectric: Washington state hydroelectric power produces two-thirds of its net electricity.

Information courtesy of ChooseEnergy.com

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C40 Cities Initiative

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A Living Wage

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