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Coal to Gas switch cuts CO2 in HALF

Coal to Gas Switch Dramatically Lowers CO2 Emissions

CO2 reduction opportunity: “Natural gas prices are low, gas storage levels are at an all-time high, and winter has started off much warmer than normal across the US. Factor in the Clean Power Plan (CPP) finalized in August, aimed at cutting CO2 emissions from power plants, and it’s clear to see that natural gas is poised to take even more power generation market share away from coal in 2016.” — from Coal-to-Gas Switching in 2016” by of BTU Analytics


CO2 emissions are lowered by Coal to Gas switching
Coal to Gas Switching can dramatically lower carbon emissions and toxic airborne pollutants like mercury, particulate and oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. IGU logo

The International Gas Union (IGU) Releases Compelling Study on Urban Air Quality:
“A Coal to Gas Switch Dramatically Improves Air Quality and Reduce Emissions of GHG and Air Pollutants – Enhancing and Saving Human Lives”

 


 

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Planetary Energy Graphic

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U.S. Energy Subsidies

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U.S. Jobs by Energy Type

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Energy Water Useage

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U.S. Energy Rates by State

Click here to enlarge the image and see the data for each state in the U.S.A.

Our energy comes from many sources, including coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewables.

As nonrenewable sources such as coal diminish due to market forces and consumer preference, the need for renewable energy sources grows.

Some U.S. states satisfy their growing renewable energy needs with wind, solar and hydropower.

Wind: Texas has the capacity to generate 18,500 megawatts hours of electricity through wind, and expects to add another 5,000 megawatts of wind generation capacity from facilities under construction.

Solar: California’s solar farms and small-scale solar power systems have 14,000 megawatts of solar power generating capacity.

Hydroelectric: Washington state hydroelectric power produces two-thirds of its net electricity.

Information courtesy of ChooseEnergy.com

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C40 Cities Initiative

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A Living Wage

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