100% Renewable Energy Is Goal For Philippines Province Palawan

by Jake Richardson

Palawan, Philippines. Image: Andrew Lillis
Palawan, Philippines. Image Credit: Andrew Lillis

Palawan is one of the Philippines natural wonders, with many tourists visiting every year. The island province is not connected to the national grid and is completely dependent upon imported diesel and bunker fuel to generate electricity.

These fuels are known to have significant emissions and can contribute to noxious air pollution. Additionally, blackouts and brownouts have been too common, and some residents don’t have access to reliable electricity sources. Power also costs about twice much in Palawan as it does in Manila.

So, moving towards being energy independent by using renewable sources is a great new direction. “Palawan is so much better off than the rest of the Philippines. Palawan is the last ecological frontier. It can prove if we can live sustainably. It can be a model to follow,” explained World Wide Fund for Nature Philippines leader Lory Tan. (Source: Rappler)

Currently, a proposed hydropower plant would partially help them reach their renewable energy goals, and create jobs. It would save money by generating power that would not need to be produced by burning imported fossil fuels and it would reduce CO2 emissions.

Palawan is a long, thin island province measuring about 280 miles long and 31 miles wide, with a human population of 771,000. There are well over 1,000 miles of coastline, mountainous areas, virgin forests, and clear waters for diving and snorkeling. There are also about 11,000 square kilometers of coral reefs. Over two hundred endemic species live there as well.

Agriculture and fishing are two of the economic staples, with a growing tourism industry due to the idyllic natural resources. So, switching to renewable energy sources makes good sense both for public health and ecological reasons. When Palawan becomes a green province, it will probably become an effective selling point for tourism. Currently, the Philippines employs geothermal and biomass as their top renewables.

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This article, 100% Renewable Energy Is Goal For Philippines Province Palawan, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Jake Richardson Hello, I have been writing online for some time, and enjoy the outdoors. If you like, you can follow me on Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/103554956530757893412/

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Geothermal Power Used In British Columbia Residential Development

by Jake Richardson

Woodland Creek residential development located in Sooke, British Columbia is using geothermal technology for its award-winning homes. Ground source heat pumps were chosen for the new craftsman style homes because they can help save an estimated $1,100 annually. Geothermal typically costs about one-third or even less than baseboard heaters powered by electricity. Additionally, no exhaust venting is required with their particular kind of geothermal system, so their homes can be better insulated. Air quality is better too in these homes, because they have superior air filtration compared with homes using electric baseboard heaters.

If the annual savings is $1,100 compared to conventional heating and cooling, they pay for themselves in about 18 years. However, in the United States a home located in Montgomery County paid their system off in 4.4 years.

After the geothermal system is paid off, it continues to save money. (It also means getting off of fossil fuels.) Another benefit is that when we invest in renewable energy we help the whole of society shift toward the new and away from the old. We need to do this because of climate change and the fact that fossil fuels are time-limited. Extraction and transportation of fossil fuels can damage the environment severely as well.

There is another potential savings for British Columbia home buyers: cash back financing for homes with a certain energy rating, and Woodland Creek homes exceed this standard. They are also constructed to Built Green standards and use Energy Star appliances.

Totangi Properties manages Woodland Creek, and won Best New Subdivision (Woodland Creek, Sooke) at the 2012 CARE Awards. In the same year they also won Built Green Builder of the Year.

Considering the decreasing cost of solar power, it may not be that far in the future that solar panels provide all the electricity for such homes, in addition to their stable geothermal systems. British Colombia is a very appropriate location for environmentally sensitive housing due to its outstanding natural beauty.

This article, Geothermal Power Used In British Columbia Residential Development, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Hello, I have been writing online for some time, and enjoy the outdoors. If you like, you can follow me on Google Plus: