Massive Growth Of Electric Cars In U.S. + Who Drives Electric Cars [Infographic]

by Zachary Shahan

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We’ve already covered much of this, but I think there are some new stats here, and it’s always interesting to see these stats about the massive growth of electric cars in the US. So, enjoy this EV Obsession repost!

The Wall Street Journal (which I just railed on the other day for a horrible post about solar energy) has actually published a pretty interesting infographic on who drives electric cars. Granted, I saved myself the probable pain of reading the related article — but maybe it was actually a decent piece as well. If you read it, let me know.

The infographic highlights several interesting facts, which I note here in text form for those of you who prefer straight text:

  • 100% electric and plug-in hybrid electric cars grew tremendously in the US in 2011, and then again in 2012. And they are going to far eclipse 2012 sales in 2013. 2010 sales = 345; 2011 sales = 17,735; 2012 sales = 52,835; 2013 = an even much higher number.
  • Over 30% of 2013 US electric car and plug-in hybrid sales have occurred in San Francisco and Los Angeles.
  • About 77% of new Leaf and Volt owners have household incomes over $100,000 per year. That compares to about 33% of all new-car buyers in 2012.
  • Plug-in car owners drive these cars less than average Americans drive — about 9,000 miles vs. 13,500 miles. (Notably, this research didn’t include Tesla Model S owners.)
  • Volt owners drive their Volts an average of 41 miles a day, while Leaf owners drive their Leafs an average of 30 miles a day.
  • The most popular time for charging EVs is in the hours just after midnight, thanks to surplus electricity supply and thus lower electricity rates (or no charge at all) in those hours.

Repost.Us - Republish This Article

This article, Massive Growth Of Electric Cars In U.S. + Who Drives Electric Cars [Infographic] is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Zachary Shahan is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy for the past four years or so. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he’s the Network Manager for their parent organization – Important Media – and he’s the Owner/Founder of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.

GM Working On $30,000, 200-Mile EV That Could Compete With Tesla Model E

by Important Media Cross-Post

Editor’s notes: Assumption is that Tesla’s affordable, 2017 EV will be called the Tesla Model E; Tesla’s use of lithium-ion batteries (a different kind than used in laptops) will not result in a worldwide shortage of such batteries (video on that coming soon). Now, here’s Chris DeMorro’s post from Gas2.

Tesla’s incredible sales success has automakers the world over wondering how to counter the Silicon Valley automaker, and General Motors could have the answer. GM is developing a 200-mile electric car with a targeted sales price of $30,000, right in the same sweet spot Elon Musk is aiming for. But who will launch first?

GM has already hinted that it is developing a line of Tesla-rivaling EVs, one with a 100-mile range and the other with 200-miles of range per charge. Elon Musk’s goal is to launch a $30,000, 200-mile electric car by 2017 at the latest. While GM hasn’t put a timetable on the launch of its own Tesla fighter, executives have said the technology exists; it’s just the price point that remains a sticky issue.

To date GM’s only pure electric car is the Spark EV, which has been surprisingly well-received, though it is for sale only in a handful of markets for now. It also has just 82 miles of range per charge, well short of Tesla’s entry-level Model S which boasts up to 208 miles of range as well as a $70,000 price tag.

But whereas Tesla needs to launch the Model X SUV next, GM is free to concentrate on an affordable competitor that might even reach the road first. It just comes down to price, with automakers stuck paying twice as much or more for their battery packs. Tesla’s use of laptop batteries (which could soon lead to a worldwide shortage) means their batteries are substantially cheaper than the batteries used in the Chevy Volt. Speaking of which, may I suggest returning to the original Volt concept (above) for design inspiration?

GM will have to overcome that price hurdle, or else sell its electric vehicles at a loss, in order to compete with Tesla. It only has about four-years to do it, though. Is GM capable of fighting Tesla on its own turf? Or will another automaker steal the show?

Source: Wall St. Journal

This article, GM Working On $30,000, 200-Mile EV That Could Compete With Tesla Model E, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Important Media Cross-PostCleanTechnica is one of 18 blogs in the Important Media blog network. With a bit of overlap in coverage, we sometimes repost some of the great content published by our sister sites.

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U.S. Army Goes All Chevy Volt With New Hybrid EV

by Tina Casey

Army looks to replace Humvee with hybrid EV (courtesy of US Army)

The US Army is working on a more fuel efficient, lightweight and protective multi-purpose vehicle to replace its notoriously outdated Humvee, and we’re shocked — shocked! — to learn that the new prototype features an all-electric drive. The new vehicle, called ULV (Ultra-Light Vehicle) primarily uses diesel fuel to power its electric motors but it can also go a few miles exclusively on its battery pack. Wow, Rush Limbaugh is going to have a field day with this one given his long record of slamming of electric vehicles, particularly GM’s Chevy Volt gas-electric hybrid.

Like the ULV, The Volt can run exclusively off its battery pack as well as its gasoline tank. So, let’s see what Rush has to say about the Army’s newfound friendship with electric drive vehicles.

[Cricket Chirps]

Although Rush is still ranking on electric vehicles at every opportunity, as far as we know he has had nothing to say about the ULV (yet), so let’s fill a little space for him.

In a broadcast last year, transcribed on his website under the headline “Electric Vehicles and the Wussification of America,” Rush had this to say about EVs:

It turns out the internal combustion engine means more to freedom, liberty, economic advancement than any electric car ever will! The electric car is the product of cowards.

Wow, way to support our troops, Rush. The Department of Defense is up to its elbows in cutting edge EV projects, and the ULV is just one example. EV-to-grid systems are another, including a new $20 million EV-to-grid demonstration project involving 500 fleet vehicles.

Another example is Los Angeles Air Force Base, which has set a goal of transitioning 100 percent of its non-tactical fleet to EVs (LA AFB is also an early solar power adopter, btw). The Navy has also established a pilot project for EV readiness at its facilities that includes solar powered EV charging stations as well as new EV charging stations at on-base convenience stores.

Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are also coming into the picture. Just take a look at the new fuel cell collaboration announced by GM and Honda, factor in GM’s partnership with the US Army on an FCEV fleet in Hawaii, and you can see the potential for widespread adoption of FCEV technology by the Department of Defense.

To sum up, the Department of Defense has been vigorously pushing for the US military to transition out of fossil fuel dependency as a matter of national security and troop safety, and EVs are already a major factor in that transition.

The Ultra-Light Vehicle And EV Technology

The Defense Department has been introducing portable solar power into combat zones, so it’s not that much of a stretch to project into the foreseeable future, when other cutting edge energy technology, including plug-in EVs and FCEVs, find their way into active zones as well as stationary bases.

Two factors are driving the Department of Defense inexorably toward renewable energy and EVs. One is the increasing load of electronic gear borne by both ground troops and vehicles, creating new demands for more flexible, efficient, lightweight, portable and scavenge-able forms of fuel as well as more effective energy storage systems.

Another factor is the piecemeal, localized nature of combat in arenas such as Afghanistan and Iraq, where remote bases and rough terrain demand the use of more up-to-date energy supply logistics than the creaking, hazardous, centuries-old fuel convoy (to say nothing of the air drop, but that’s a whole ‘nother can of worms).

With that in mind, let’s take a closer look at the ULV prototype. The project comes under TARDEC, the Army’s Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center, in partnership with the military armor solutions company Hardwire (also known as the maker of bulletproof whiteboards, but whatever).

In a curious bit of timing, TARDEC announced the completion of three new ULV prototypes last week, while in the middle of redesigning the website for the project, so aside from TARDEC’s press release there’s not much available online as of this writing. However, you can still find a great rundown of the ULV in TARDEC’s Accelerate publication (see page 28 at the TARDEC zmags link), and there is also a cache of the old material here.

Billed as the “world’s toughest hybrid,” the ULV is designed to provide improved protection for occupants as well as fuel efficiency, which TARDEC describes as “mission critical.”

The electric drive factors into the protection goal by eliminating a lot of extra hardware, especially underneath the vehicle, which enable blast mitigation technologies to deploy with minimal interference.

As for the drive itself, there are two electric drive motors, one in front and one behind, each of which can independently power the vehicle. Each motor is coupled directly to a differential, driving planetary geared hubs. Here’ s the goodies from the cache:

The planetary geared hubs keep weight to a minimum by reducing the half-shaft torque requirement, keeping each traction motor centrally located between each wheel set, and providing high drive efficiency. The engine/generator “gen-set” mounted in the front provides the continuous power, while the battery mounted in the rear provides power surge and energy storage capability. The combination offers power redundancy, as only one energy source is required for motion, and the battery is capable of moving the vehicle on electric power alone (capable of 10+ mile range on battery alone).

The next step will be to shake the three prototypes down. One is going to undergo rigorous testing at TARDEC’s brand new Ground Systems Power and Energy Laboratory, which was designed with a focus on electric vehicles, alternative energy and energy storage technologies.

Stay tuned.

You too, Rush.

Follow me on Twitter and Google+.

This article, US Army Goes All Chevy Volt With New Hybrid EV, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Tina Casey specializes in military and corporate sustainability, advanced technology, emerging materials, biofuels, and water and wastewater issues. Tina’s articles are reposted frequently on Reuters, Scientific American, and many other sites. You can also follow her on Twitter @TinaMCasey and Google+.

 

Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt Both Break Their US Monthly Sales Records

by Zachary Shahan — Special to JBS News

The month of August was a good one for plug-in electric car companies. Two of the three leading electric cars (in terms of sales) broke their US monthly sales records last month (we don’t have monthly sales numbers for the other one).

The Nissan Leaf’s new all-time best is 2,420, while the Chevy Volt’s new all-time best is 3,351.

nissan-leaf-sales

The August sales results also now put the Chevy Volt (14,994) ahead of the Nissan Leaf (14,123) in cumulative 2013 sales. The two cars have been trading places at the top for the past few months or so. It feels like the last stretch of an important race in a Hollywood movie, IMHO.

2013 Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt sales are leagues above their 2012 sales. As regular readers know, the US Leaf tantalized the market with a $6,400 price cut in January (thanks to the start of production within the US, which cut costs tremendously), while the Chevy Volt finally did the same last month with a $5,000 price cut (which may not have been as warranted as the Leaf’s).

volt-production

I’ll have a full August 2013 electric and hybrid car sales update here soon. Hold on tight, it might be an interesting one. Overall, though, as I think you’d guess, it looks like August was a record month for plug-in electric cars.

This article, Nissan Leaf & Chevy Volt Both Break Their US Monthly Sales Records, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy for the past four years or so. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he’s the Network Manager for their parent organization – Important Media – and he’s the Owner/Founder of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.

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