GM Working On $30,000, 200-Mile EV That Could Compete With Tesla Model E

by Important Media Cross-Post

Editor’s notes: Assumption is that Tesla’s affordable, 2017 EV will be called the Tesla Model E; Tesla’s use of lithium-ion batteries (a different kind than used in laptops) will not result in a worldwide shortage of such batteries (video on that coming soon). Now, here’s Chris DeMorro’s post from Gas2.

Tesla’s incredible sales success has automakers the world over wondering how to counter the Silicon Valley automaker, and General Motors could have the answer. GM is developing a 200-mile electric car with a targeted sales price of $30,000, right in the same sweet spot Elon Musk is aiming for. But who will launch first?

GM has already hinted that it is developing a line of Tesla-rivaling EVs, one with a 100-mile range and the other with 200-miles of range per charge. Elon Musk’s goal is to launch a $30,000, 200-mile electric car by 2017 at the latest. While GM hasn’t put a timetable on the launch of its own Tesla fighter, executives have said the technology exists; it’s just the price point that remains a sticky issue.

To date GM’s only pure electric car is the Spark EV, which has been surprisingly well-received, though it is for sale only in a handful of markets for now. It also has just 82 miles of range per charge, well short of Tesla’s entry-level Model S which boasts up to 208 miles of range as well as a $70,000 price tag.

But whereas Tesla needs to launch the Model X SUV next, GM is free to concentrate on an affordable competitor that might even reach the road first. It just comes down to price, with automakers stuck paying twice as much or more for their battery packs. Tesla’s use of laptop batteries (which could soon lead to a worldwide shortage) means their batteries are substantially cheaper than the batteries used in the Chevy Volt. Speaking of which, may I suggest returning to the original Volt concept (above) for design inspiration?

GM will have to overcome that price hurdle, or else sell its electric vehicles at a loss, in order to compete with Tesla. It only has about four-years to do it, though. Is GM capable of fighting Tesla on its own turf? Or will another automaker steal the show?

Source: Wall St. Journal

This article, GM Working On $30,000, 200-Mile EV That Could Compete With Tesla Model E, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Important Media Cross-PostCleanTechnica is one of 18 blogs in the Important Media blog network. With a bit of overlap in coverage, we sometimes repost some of the great content published by our sister sites.

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Electric Car Sales Pass Gas Stations For The First Time

By Jo Borrás – Special to JBS News

A Lot of EVs

EV milestones are coming hard and fast these days, with records falling, new companies showing up, and others shutting down before they really ever got going. There are highlights, however, and as electric cars sales boom, the “there are now more electric cars than …” comparisons are starting, as well. This week, the number of electric cars reportedly passed the number of gas stations in the US! (Of course, there are already hundreds of times more charging “stations” than gas stations — makes you wonder if gasmobile drivers don’t get range anxiety.)

You can check out the new numbers and get more details about recent electric car sales in the full article, which originally appeared on Gas 2, below. Enjoy!

It’s a Good News Day: There Are Now More Electric Cars than Gas Stations

More Electric Cars than Gas Stations

It’s another good news day here at Gas 2, as the total number of electric cars in the US of A has passed the number of gas stations for the first time since- Um … Since let’s say 1920.

120,000 to 119,000! WHOO-HOO!!

Now, of course, there are a few asterisks involved – chief among them is the car that can be seen in the photo, above. That Chevy Volt? It’s a plug-in hybrid as opposed to a “pure” electric car, but its numbers are included in the figuring, which also happens to use the 2007 numbers for gas stations (those are the most recent numbers available from the census, but most industry analysts expect that number to have dropped since getting the financing required to buy a gas station became significantly harder to get and keep after 2008.

With plug-in hybrid and electric car sales currently booming, we’re not too far away from the day when the annual sales of electric/plug-in cars exceeds that 119,000 figure. From there, we start talking about the tipping point for EVs to become the mainstream choice, because that day is coming, too. Even Bob “Maximum” Lutz thinks so.

Stay tuned.

Sources | Photos: US Census, Green Car Reports.

This article, Electric Car Sales Pass Gas Stations For The First Time, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

I’ve been involved in motorsports and tuning since 1997, and write for a number of blogs in the Important Media network. You can find me on Twitter, Skype (jo.borras) or Google+.

 

Over 50% Of Electric Cars Sold In US Are In 5 Cities

by Nicholas Brown — Special to JBS News

You have probably heard of certain cities which have particularly high electric car ownership rates, often due to their generous incentives. Can you name which five cities have over 50% of the electric cars sold in the US?

los angeles

Image Credit: Los Angeles via Shutterstock

Here’s the list:

  1. Los Angeles, California
  2. San Francisco, California
  3. New York City
  4. Seattle, Washington
  5. Atlanta, Georgia

Georgia offers a tax credit for electric vehicles that is equal to 20% of the vehicle’s cost, up to a maximum amount of $5,000. California has many charging stations, which might have contributed to its presence in the list above, but it also offers a $2,500 incentive for electric vehicles. (The charging stations may just be in place due to the high electric car ownership in the state… it’s that whole chicken & egg question again.)

New York City has its own EV policies that surely helped stimulate EV adoption a bit, but the fact that it is the largest city in the US (by far) is also surely a factor.

Image Credits: San FranciscoLos Angeles via Shutterstock