World’s Largest (4GW) Solar Project Planned For India

by Jake Richardson – Special to JBS News

The Ultra-Mega Green Solar Power Project is intended to eventually produce 4 GW of solar power. If this goal is reached, it will be more than twice as large as India’s current solar power production. An estimated 6,000 million kWh per year will be fed into the national grid, if the project is realized.

The location is near Sambhar Lake, almost fifty miles from Jaipur, the capital city of Rajasthan. Over 20,000 acres will be used, but it appears so far it has not been reported if PV or concentrated solar will used, or a hybrid. Rajasthan was chosen due to high irradiation levels and large amounts of open space.

The first phase of the mega project will be constructing 1 GW through a collaboration between Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL), Rajasthan Electronics and Instruments Limited (REIL) and SSL, the Solar Energy Corporation of India, and the Power Grid Corporation of India. SJVN, a hydro-electric power plant developer, will also contribute. The first phase could be completed by as early as 2016.

Funding for the 4 GW project could come from a newly passed bill for Corporate Social Responsibility. It requires 2% of annual net profits from certain companies to be used for projects for the social good.

Solar looks like a very promising path for India, because their total capacity for producing power from sunshine is vast with 5,000 TWh of solar insolation annually. Solar power has been increasing in leaps there. It makes sense that it would, with the abundant sunshine and very strong engineering culture in both professional and academic circles.

The national government is also committed to reducing climate change emissions, and trying to stabilize the country’s fluctuating energy problems. Additionally, investing in domestic, renewable energy production is a good long-term strategy, compared with sticking to the importing of fossil fuels. Currently, solar provides less than one percent of India’s power. Coal and hydro power are two of the main sources, but India has been experiencing power shortages. In 2012, a blackout caused almost 700 million people there to have no power.

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This article, World’s Largest (4GW) Solar Project Planned For India, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Jake Richardson Hello, I have been writing online for some time, and enjoy the outdoors. If you like, you can follow me on Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/103554956530757893412/

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Top 20 Utility Scale Solar Countries Graph Of The Day

by Giles Parkinson – Special to JBS News

This article originally published on RenewEconomy

The latest update of utility scale solar developments round the world shows that the US has just joined China as the second country to have installed more than 3 GW of “big solar” and will soon be joined by Germany.

But Australia still does not make the big solar top 20 list compiled by Wiki-Solar – although countries such as Ukraine, Portugal, Thailand, the Czech Republic, Peru, Romania and Bulgaria do.

Screen-Shot-2013-09-03-at-8.09.45-AM

[Although there are thousands of small rooftop installations in the country] Australia has only one utility-scale solar installation at present — the Greenough River solar farm in WA — that meets the 10MW qualification for inclusion in the table, although four other projects are due to be built over the next two years. One, the 20MW Royalla project, reached financial close last week and will be the first to obtain bank finance in the country.

Two others are to be built in the ACT under that government’s solar auction program and the other, the 155MW AGL Energy project at Broken Hill and Nyngan, will begin construction next year.

Wiki-Solar says it is thinking of redefining the cut-off for “big solar” to 5MW, given that many projects in Germany and other countries are being built in that range.

If that were to happen,  China, Germany and the USA would still be the only three countries in the 3-4GW range, and India and Spain would rank next with between 1 and 2GW. It would double the number of projects world wide to be included in the table, but would not change Australia’s ranking. It doesn’t have any projects between 1.5MW and 1.0MW either.

This article, Top 20 Utility Scale Solar Countries – Graph Of The Day, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

is the founding editor of RenewEconomy.com.au, an Australian-based website that provides news and analysis on cleantech, carbon, and climate issues. Giles is based in Sydney and is watching the (slow, but quickening) transformation of Australia’s energy grid with great interest.

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Excerpt of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s WEF speech this morning in New Delhi

by John Brian Shannon
Here is a short excerpt of the speech the Prime Minister of Canada, the Right Honourable Stephen Harper delivered at the World Economic Forum, November 7, 2012 in New Delhi, India:

[“It is also a pleasure to be back at the World Economic Forum, a place where a great many people who want to make a difference regularly come to meet.

“And I am delighted to see that you have also chosen to be in India, a place where globally important decisions are increasingly being made.

“Almost a year ago, during your last Davos gathering, I highlighted some of Canada’s economic strengths and challenges.

“On the former, on the strongest, Canadian banks remain the soundest in the world.

“The World Economic Forum is one of several organizations that says so.

“Canada’s net debt-to-GDP ratio remains the lowest in the G-7, and the lowest by far.

“Thus Canada’s top credit rating has been reaffirmed by all of the major rating agencies.

“Among G-7 countries, Canada now has the lowest overall tax rate on new business investment.

“Canada also possesses a diverse yet harmonious society, with public institutions and a public service noted for professionalism and integrity.

“All of these assets, as Borge mentioned, and others have helped Canada better weather and better recover from the global recession.

“Indeed, despite the uncertainty of the times, the Canadian economy has now added more than eight hundred thousand net new jobs since July 2009.

“Still, we remain acutely aware of the difficult global trends, especially for many developed countries.

“As I said to the World Economic Forum in January, many countries with which Canada is traditionally aligned continue to be weighed down by debts they cannot seem to control, by entitlements they can no longer afford and by growth which threatens to remain sluggish for the foreseeable future.

“As I said in January, it is high time we realize that:

“The wealth of western economies is no more inevitable than the poverty of emerging ones.”

“As these last four years have revealed, the wealth we enjoy today in the West is not inevitable.

“Our standard of living will be based on – and will be based only on – strong, growth-orientated policies and on getting the hard choices right.

“That is why, over the past year, the Government of Canada has committed itself to a series of determined actions, we want to help ensure that growth, job creation and economic prosperity will be there for Canadians over the long term.]

End excerpt.

This information was provided by the Prime Minister’s office (Official News Feed, November 7, 2012)

JOHN BRIAN SHANNON

To follow John Brian Shannon on social media – place a check-mark beside your choice of Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn: FullyFollowMe/johnbrianshannon

Will Global Sustainability Ever Be Possible?

by John Brian Shannon

If you haven’t seen these two short videos on demographics and sustainability from Professor Hans Rosling take the time to do it now. Hans at his best!

If you prefer to watch video 1 at www.ted.com click here>> “Hans Rosling Shows the Best Stats You’ve Ever Seen”

If you prefer to watch video 2 at http://www.ted.com here>> “Hans Rosling on Global Population Growth”

Bonus video from The Economist: “VideoGraphic: Global Fertility”

Bonus article from The Economist: “Go Forth and Multiply a Lot Less”

John Brian Shannon

John Brian Shannon

ABOUT JOHN BRIAN SHANNON

I write about green energy, sustainable development and economics. My blogs appear in the Arabian Gazette, EcoPoint, EnergyBoom, Huffington Post, United Nations Development Programme, WACSI — and other quality publications.

“It is important to assist all levels of government and the business community to find sustainable ways forward for industry and consumers.”

Green Energy blog: http://johnbrianshannon.com
Economics blog: https://jbsnews.wordpress.com
Twitter: @JBSCanada

 

Fascinating Political and Energy Read by Oilprice.com

Republished for your information (with the kind permission of James Stafford of Oilprice.com) is the always fascinating Oilprice.com newsletter — complete with an informative article about the recent scientific, political and economic progress of algae-sourced biofuel in the United States.

I highly recommend you visit and bookmark oilprice.com as it publishes information ahead of the mainstream media, it has excellent links and is a respected source for up-to-date information about the energy industry and the politics surrounding it. Visit oilprice.com here…

John Brian Shannon

Oilprice.com is wholly responsible for the article, the imagery and the opinions contained below.

OIL PRICE.com

Dear OilPrice Reader,

Energy Intelligence Report                   Newsletter #130  /  4th August 2012

Like Oilprice.com Intelligence Report: Algae Growing on Investors as Technology Advances on Facebook

Greetings from London.It’s been an interesting couple of weeks in the energy world with yo-yoing oil prices, increasing geopolitical tensions, India’s power cut and a host of other topics keeping our editorial team on their toes.We have put together an interesting investment report for you below that takes a look at the advances made in the algae biofuels sector and why recent technical advances and strategic partnerships have made this an area investors should start paying attention to.But before we get to that here is what’s been happening in the energy world:This week was a busy one for US energy policy, and renewable energy tax credits were the focus of legislative battles and Obama-Romney campaign rhetoric. Republicans in the Senate dealt Romney a blow when the Senate Finance Committee passed a one-year extension of the wind energy tax credit. The deciding factor was when Republican Senator Charles E. Grassley of Iowa—where wind energy creates thousands of jobs—threatened to side with the Democrats if Team Romney insisted on removing the $3.3 million tax break.Also included in the tax break package is a proposal that would boost development in the biofuels sector and include algae among the lists of biomass for biofuels production for the first time. On Wednesday, the Senate Finance Committee submitted a proposal to extend the $1/gallon biodiesel tax credit and to include algae, extending the tax credit for another year after its expiration on 31 December 2013 and retroactively to 31 December 2011.The tax package passed the committee on Thursday in a 19-5 vote. When the Senate returns in September, this will be a top legislative priority.Solyndra was also a major feature of this week’s DC energy news, with the release of a House GOP report on the government’s backing of the failed solar firm. The report details what it calls a “cautionary tale” of political pressure and misguided policy that cost taxpayers half a billion dollars. The report, the result of an 18-month investigation, failed to find concrete evidence to support GOP allegations that Obama administration officials funded Solyndra in return for campaign donations.Elsewhere in the world, the geopolitical energy dynamic that is culminating in a fast-moving showdown between the Iraqi central government and the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) in northern Iraq deserves particular attention. The mainstream media is just now catching up to this development, which Oilprice.com has covered extensively over the past couple of months. Notably, since ExxonMobil provoked the ire of Baghdad in October by cutting a deal with the KRG and bypassing the Iraqi central government, the past couple of months have seen this trend increase greatly in momentum, with Chevron, Total and Gazprom Neft following in ExxonMobil’s footsteps.This is the number one geopolitical game to monitor at present. Baghdad is attempting to regain the advantage by banning oil companies working with the KRG from involvement in Iraqi national oil ministry deals. So far, this threat has not proved a sufficient deterrent. This is a dangerous geopolitical game on the part of the oil majors and particularly the US and Turkey, which are supporting this maneuvering, the implications of which will have long-term consequences.That’s it for the news this week.I wanted to take the opportunity to mention our forum again which is growing very quickly with more industry professionals, investors, traders and energy news enthusiasts joining on a daily basis. Please do take a moment to stop by and join in the conversation. Click here to visit the forum.I hope you enjoy this week’s report below and have a great weekend.James Stafford
Editor, Oilprice.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/oilandenergy
Discuss: http://oilprice.com/discussion

Algae Growing on Investors as Technology Advances

It’s been a long and challenging road, but algae biofuels are finally at the point where investors should take notice as technology advances and variety of strategic partnerships—from oil and gas to power utilities, agricultural processes and chemical plants–are replacing subsidies to eventually make the industry commercially viable on its own merits.

Algae produces some carbon dioxide when burned, but it takes the same carbon dioxide in to grow. So when algae farms grow massive quantities to be turned into biofuels, the end result is that they actually suck greenhouse gas out of the air. It also has other advantages over biofuels from corn or soybeans, in that it does not require soil or fresh water to grow. It also has the potential to produce more energy per hectare than any land crop.

Currently, high cost of capital and operations limit bio-based materials and chemicals to a few facilities located where corn and cane are plentiful and cheap. Algae can change that.

All that’s been missing is the necessary technology to harness mass production.

A recent study put out by the respected energy research firm SBI predicts a compound annual growth rate of 43.1% and a $1.6 billion market in 2015 for algae biofuels. That is double digit growth for the emerging industry, which is receiving a sizable development boost as strategic partnerships are gradually replacing the millions in loans from the US Department of Energy since 2009.

SBI’s “Algae Biofuels Technologies: Global Market and Product Trends 2010-2015” specifically points out that the production of algae for biofuels is the “most viable and attractive” of biofuels because of its high yield per acre and minimum environmental impact.

“Strategic partnerships from ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP, Dow Chemical, Desmet Ballestra and many others will drive the investment needed to successfully commercialise algae biofuels. Private investment and venture capital will also provide funding through 2015,” according to SBI.

One particular area of promising investment is the technology being developed to harness algae’s potential.

One example is the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Labs (INL) purchase order of two test-scale units for dewatering algae and removing contaminants from frack water from Origin Oil, Inc. The significance of this is that it boosts algae technological development as Origin Oil focuses both on cleantech processes for oil and gas and for harvesting algae.

INL is optimistic that the new equipment would significantly reduce the algal dewatering barrier, which in turn would allow for the dewatering of larger quantities of algae for use in the production of feedstocks blended from algae biomass. A key problem contributing to costs is the quick evaporation of pond water, which is expensive to continually replenish.

This is a strategic partnership between OriginOil and the INL, via a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). Specifically, OriginOil’s Algae Appliance Model 4 can continuously concentrate up to four liters of algae production per minute. OriginOil also has a joint venture in Ennesys, in Paris, where it is testing algae in urban energy generation also using the Algae Appliance Model 4.

Another boost to the industry is the 2 August Senate Finance Committee mark-up of the Family and Business Tax Cut Certainty Act of 2012, which contained a proposal to extend the $1/gallon biodiesel tax credit and make algae eligible for the credit. The proposal extends the tax credit for another year after it expires on 31 December 2013 and is effective retroactively to 31 December 2011. In addition, the algae tax credit will apply to producers who sell their fuel to refineries for further processing, rather than only to producers selling for end use as a fuel. This is a significant point and a significant victory for the biofuels industry.

There are plenty of naysayers, particularly when it comes to the current cost of using algae in biofuels production. According to Lux Research, right now algae is a “cost-intensive loser”. Lux analysts claim that algae cultivation yields a 48% loss because of the high capital costs for growing algae at an industrial scale. They put the price at about $202,000 per hectare.

The costs are high for the time being, but we view investment from a development perspective and we see forward movement in this emerging industry and are particularly upbeat about the shift away from energy department loans to strategic partnerships that will work to tap the vast potential of algae for biofuels production and render it commercially viable. Getting in now on the technology will translate into an advantage.

Check out the 6th Annual Algae Biomass Summit in Denver, Colorado from 24-27 September for more insight into technological advances and how innovators are working to unlock the full potential of algae as a feedstock for fuel, food and other co-products.

By. Oilprice.com analysts