Kyocera Stadium Goes Solar, Assists The Hague’s CO2 Neutral Goal

by Cynthia Shahan.

Renewable Energy at The KYOCERA Stadium in The Hague, Netherlands will come in the form of thousands of solar panels on the roof area of the stadium.
Renewable Energy at The KYOCERA Stadium in The Hague, Netherlands will come in the form of 2900 solar panels on the roof area of the stadium, giving an assist to The Hague’s goal of carbon neutrality by 2040.

Sports are thriving businesses for many communities and countries. Soccer is our family’s personal favorite. We are not alone — the game is the most popular in the world. The World Cup creates an influx of business for any country where it is held — this sport is the heart of many families and countries. It is important, of course, that such a large business move towards much greater use renewable energy and energy efficiency. Luckily, we’re seeing movements in that direction.

As we know, KYOCERA has been actively engaged in supplying solar modules to businesses, homes, and sports facilities around the world. According to a recent press release, it reports that the latest on a list of sports facilities around the world utilizing Kyocera solar modules is a soccer stadium in The Hague, Netherlands:

[T]he Kyocera Group announced that it is supplying 725 kilowatts of solar modules for the KYOCERA Stadium in The Hague, Netherlands. On January 22, the signing of a letter of intent in The Hague signaled the start of another major Kyocera solar project in connection with professional sports in Europe — after the Stade de Suisse in Bern, Switzerland. The roof of The Hague’s soccer stadium is to be equipped with 2,900 high-quality Kyocera solar modules.

This will of course help to lower greenhouse gas emissions, and it will contribute to The Hague’s plan to become carbon neutral by 2040. It will also help encourage residents and visitors to go solar themselves, an unquantifiable but important benefit. Here’s more on the news from KYOCERA:

Furthermore, the plans of the signatories, namely the city of The Hague, Kyocera Fineceramics GmbH, NV ADO Den Haag soccer club, Croon Elektrotechniek, Oskomera solar power solutions, Rabobank, Steeds and Vrolijk Technical Services, go further than just equipping the stadium roof with solar power: The system will become one of the largest building-based photovoltaic projects in the Netherlands — allowing CO2 emissions to be reduced by up to 272 tons a year and providing the equivalent electricity required by around 200 typical homes. That means the project will make a valuable contribution to The Hague’s plans to become carbon neutral by 2040.

The stadium is the home of the first-division Dutch soccer team ADO Den Haag and has a capacity of 15,000. In addition to soccer, the stadium is used for field hockey games. The construction work is set to take place this summer, immediately following the Hockey World Cup, which will use the stadium as a venue.

Kyocera set the standard for the use of solar technology in the sporting world in 2004 when it supplied 1.3 megawatts of solar modules for what was at the time the world’s largest stadium-based solar power generating system at the Stade de Suisse (home of the Swiss soccer team BSC Young Boys, and a venue for Euro 2008). The 8,000 solar modules installed there have since been producing an annual output of 1,124,045 kWh. The company has also supplied its solar modules to other sports facilities around the world, including the Townsville RSL Stadium in North Queensland, Australia; and the MAZDA Stadium in Hiroshima, Japan.

Read more KYOCERA news on CleanTechnica here:

Largest Solar Power Station In Japan Opened By Kyocera

Kyocera Supplies Solar Powered Generators to Medical Facility in Tajikistan

Kyocera Solar Modules Show Only 8.3% Performance Degradation After 20 Years

Kyocera Invests in Smart Home & Energy Technology Research

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This article, Kyocera Soccer Stadium In The Hague Goes Solar, Helps The Hague’s Goal Of Being Carbon Neutral By 2040, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Cynthia ShahanCynthia Shahan is an Organic Farmer, Classical Homeopath, Art Teacher, Creative Writer, Anthropologist, Natural Medicine Activist, Journalist, and mother of four unconditionally loving spirits, teachers, and environmentally conscious beings who have lit the way for me for decades.

Europe Exits Fossil Fuel, will hit 30% Renewables by 2017

by Zachary Shahan

Following up on a Credit Suisse report stating that ~85% of US energy demand growth would come from renewables by 2025, we thought it would be good to take a look at the energy trends in Europe as well.

Actually, one of our readers pitched this idea prior to the publishing of that article, and did most of the research for this piece. I then had the pleasure of putting it together to create the primarily positive (with one notable hiccup) non-fiction story below. Enjoy!

Let’s start with the broad overview. UBS analysts in 2013 reported that utilities in Europe need to shut down 30% of their gas, coal, and oil-fed power capacity by 2017 — not necessarily to fight global warming, cut pollution, or cut fuel imports, but because the renewable energy revolution is pushing fossil fuels off the grid.

In other words, increasingly cheap and fast-growing renewables are killing fossil fuels in Europe

“Producers must close 49 gigawatts of capacity to stabilize profits at 2012 levels, analysts led by Paris-based Per Lekander wrote in an e-mailed report,” according to Rachel Morison of Bloomberg.

“That includes 24 gigawatts of ‘mainly cashflow positive capacity’ on top of the 7 gigawatts that utilities already plan to shut and an additional 18 gigawatts of closures expected to be announced.”

“The most important driver has undoubtedly been the remarkable increase of renewable capacity, and in particular solar, mainly in Germany,” Per Lekander said.

Image Credit: Nuclear Energy Agency and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation & Development, via @SamHamels
Image Credit: Nuclear Energy Agency and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation & Development, via @SamHamels

Unfortunately, the most closures are projected to be of natural gas power plants. Coal power’s big exit is projected to get rolling in 2015.

However, that’s not to say no coal power plants are being closed or kept off the grid until 2015. Back in August 2013, it was announced that a coal power plant in Finland would shut down due to its failing competitiveness.

“Finland’s largest utility, Fortum, is closing a coal-fired power plant in Inkoo, west of Helsinki,” yle wrote.

“Built in the mid-1970s, the 750 MW plant has rarely been used in recent years, only supplying backup power to the Nordic grid during periods of peak demand. It has long been a loss-maker. This is partly due to falling electricity prices in Europe, driven by Germany’s shift toward renewable energy.”

The Finnish government, in the meantime, has committed itself to transitioning to a clean, renewable energy future — only logical, right?

And in the center of much of the clean energy revolution, Germany, dozens of coal power plants have been canceled or closed in recent years.

In Germany, dozens of coal power plants have been canceled or closed in recent years, with others 'walking the plank'.
In Germany, dozens of coal power plants have been canceled or closed in recent years, with others ‘walking the plank’.

It’s true that coal power production increased in Germany in 2012, but you have to put that into some context to understand why. What many people don’t know is that many coal power plants were previously planned for Germany.

The renewable energy revolution hasn’t increased the need for coal power plants, as many misinformers would have you believe, but has resulted in the majority being dropped. Closing of nuclear power plants, combined with high natural gas prices in Europe, however, did result in a slight rise in coal power production.

Natural gas is clearly the fossil fuel getting hit hardest in Europe at the moment. As Tino Andresen and Tara Patel of Bloomberg wrote in March 2013.

“Three years ago, Germany’s largest utility spent 400 million euros ($523 million) building a natural gas-fired power station. Later this month, the company may close the plant because it’s losing so much money.”

EON’s Irsching-5, the power plant in discussion, only operated 25% of the time in 2012!

The factors for the quick death of such an expensive plant were varied, though: “As Europe’s weak economy holds back electricity demand, cheaper coal, requirements to buy renewable energy and the collapsing cost of carbon permits are undercutting gas-fired plants.”

But it’s not only happening in Germany

“Gas-fired plants are stopped three days out of four,” Gerard Mestrallet, chief executive officer of GDF Suez, France’s former gas monopoly, said at a briefing on Feb. 28.

“The thermal industry is in crisis. There is overcapacity.”

The story is essentially the same in the Netherlands, Spain, the Czech Republic, and other European countries.

In the end, the story is actually rather simple: as more renewable energy comes on line, something has to go off line.

Aside from nuclear power plants that are being shuttered due to old age and citizen demand, the big loser at the moment is natural gas. However, coal is on its way out too, just a bit more slowly. Of course, if there was a higher price on carbon, or other fossil fuel market dynamics changed, we could see those two switch places on their way out the door.

Anything more you’d like to add? Chime in below.

Keep up to date with the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our main cleantech newsletter, or by stalking our homepage. We’re not Kim Kardashian’s Twitter feed, but I think we’re more interesting.

This article, Europe’s Fossil Fuel Exit — 30% Of Fossil Fuel Power Capacity To Close By 2017, UBS Analysts Project, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Zachary ShahanZachary Shahan is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy for the past four years or so. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he’s the Network Manager for their parent organization – Important Media – and he’s the Owner/Founder of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.

Tesla Hits Europe — New Assembly Plant In Holland, The Netherlands

by Nathan – Special to JBS News

Originally published on CleanTechnica sister site Ecopreneurist.

Tesla’s first assembly plant on the European continent is now open for business! The Tilburg Assembly Plant — located in the Netherlands, only about 50 miles from the port of Rotterdam — will now serve as the final assembly and distribution point for all Model S vehicles sold on the European continent. The plant will also function as Tesla’s European service and parts headquarters.

The 18,900 m2 assembly plant will now receive nearly complete Model S units shipped over from the US for final assembly before being delivered to customers throughout the European market.

Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Image Credit: Tesla Motors

Green Car Congress has more:

Being centrally located in Tilburg enables efficient, timely and cost effective operations throughout Europe, Tesla says. Parts can be distributed to anywhere across the continent within 12 hours. Tilburg, about 80 km (50 miles) from the port of Rotterdam, is connected by an excellent rail and motorway network to all major markets.

Some of the very first Dutch, Belgian, French and German Model S customers received their cars today at the brand new facility.

On a related note — and as I’m sure you already know — deliveries of the Model S to European customers began in Norway towards the beginning of August.

With expanding demand in Europe as well as the US, it seems Tesla is needing to diversify it suppliers. There is also word that it is going to start buying batteries from Samsung as well as Panasonic.

English: Tesla Model S Prototype at the 2009 F...
English: Tesla Model S Prototype at the 2009 Frankfurt Motor Show (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article, Tesla Hits Europe — New Assembly Plant In Holland, The Netherlands, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

For the fate of the sons of men and the fate of beasts is the same; as one dies, so dies the other. They all have the same breath, and man has no advantage over the beasts; for all is vanity. – Ecclesiastes 3:19

Largest EV Fast-Charging Network To Roll Out In Netherlands

By Zachary Shahan — cleantechnica.com

Via EV Obsession:

The world’s largest nationwide network of EV fast-chargers is planned for the Netherlands, and ABB has just won the contract.

The task for ABB is to put a fast-charging station within 50 kilometres (31 miles) of all 16.7 million inhabitants of the Netherlands. In total, that will come to about 200 EV fast-charging stations.

Image Credit: ABB

Image Credit: ABB
.

Here’s more info from ABB:

Each of the more than 200 Fastned stations along Dutch highways will be equipped with several multi-standards fast chargers, such as the 50 kilowatt (kW) Terra 52 and Terra 53 models, capable of charging electric vehicles in 15-30 minutes. The first ABB Terra fast chargers are due to be delivered in September 2013. Construction of the Fastned stations, which will have solar canopies, is expected to be completed by 2015.

To date, the Netherlands is the most populous country to roll out a nationwide fast-charging network. Fast-chargers will be located a maximum of 50 kilometers apart along all highways, and because of ABB’s multi-standard design, the network will be capable of serving EVs offered by all major car brands from Europe, Asia and the USA. ABB’s open standards-based cloud connectivity solution allows Fastned to create a user-friendly payment and access service for all drivers.

Sounds pretty good. For more details, check out the ABB news release.

*Note that the world’s first nationwide fast-charging network is supposed to roll out in Estonia.