US Cities In Which The Fewest People Drive To Work

by Nicholas Brown

Percentage of commutes done by bike, public transportation, and foot.
Percentage of commutes done by bike, public transportation, and foot.Image Credit: IQC.

The US is such a large country, that it has co-cultures and is almost like multiple countries in one. As a part of that, people’s habits and the accessibility of transportation options vary significantly throughout the country.

For example, in Oklahoma City, only 2.2% of people travel to work without cars. Tulsa and Fort Worth are tied just an edge above that. Notably, Tulsa is also in Oklahoma – its second-largest city. Meanwhile, in New York City, 67% of people travel to work without cars. It’s a world of difference.

Leading the nation at 67%, NYC’s subway system and density are surely big parts of that. There is also the fact that intense congestion (largely a result of high density) in some parts of the city can deter people from driving, as they don’t appreciate long waits in traffic.

The Institute For Quality Communities, which is at the University of Oklahoma, gathered data from Census metrics of how Americans usually travel to work to come to  the above conclusions. Here are more of their findings:

Next are charts where it is broken down by region and individual mode share.

Here’s the Northeast & Mid-Atlantic:

Image Credit: IQC.
Image Credit: IQC.

The Midwest:

chart-3
Image Credit: IQC.

The Southeast:

chart-4
Image Credit: IQC.

Finally, here are cities where bike transportation increased significantly over the last decade:

chart-5
Image Credit: IQC.

Congratulations to these cities for their strong and effective support for bicycling. Let’s see if these cities can surpass New York’s public transportation usage rate someday!

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This article, US Cities In Which The Fewest People Drive To Work, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Nicholas Brown has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, geography, and much more. My website is: Kompulsa.

Solar Universe acquires Gen110 to become a Top Player

by Nicholas Brown – Special to JBS News

Editor’s note: Get used to hearing the term ‘distributed power’ as dramatic growth rates are set to occur in the U.S.A. between now and 2020. The expected boom in ‘distributed solar power’ [which are those installations that are placed on rooftops of homes and commercial businesses] is based on Deutsche Bank (and other) predictions that:

  1. solar PV module prices will continue to fall
  2. grid prices will continue rise
  3. innovative financing options will provide ample and cheap capital.
Rooftop Solar Panels. Image via manfredxy on Shutterstock.

(Article begins) Solar Universe, a solar franchise company, has just announced that it has acquired Gen110 (formerly Solmentum), which is a distributed energy service provider. It also unveiled a new internet-based design center intended to streamline solar sales.

Rooftop PV system
Rooftop Solar Panels. Image via manfredxy on Shutterstock.

Solar Universe believes that Gen110, who it said is a pioneer in direct sales, provides a new and affordable sales method which enables it to avoid expensive marketing campaigns.

Gen110 provides customers with generators for no installation or upgrade fees, then customers pay for the electricity at a guaranteed rate, according to their website. This enables people to generate their own electricity without facing the large initial cost of buying a generator outright, similar to SolarCity, Sunrun, Sungevity, and a handful of other such companies.

As Joe Bono, the founder and CEO of Solar Universe, said: “Gen 110 is a terrific complementary asset to our core business. Our business has always been based on arming our franchises with the best customer acquisition tools. The addition of Gen110 allows us to develop new offices with great speed and lower cost than ever before.”

“Our vision is that one day every home will produce on-site electricity, so combining our sales expertise with the installation know-how of Solar Universe is a very exciting prospect,” said Jason Brown, Co-Founder and CEO of Gen110. “We’re looking forward to working with Solar Universe and providing homeowners with a more seamless path to getting cleaner and cheaper electricity.”

Gen110 is based in San Francisco, California, and the name Gen110 was coined because of the 110-volt outlets that most American households use. Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers invested in the company in May 2012.

Source: Solar Universe materials sent to CleanTechnica.

About the Author

has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, geography, and much more. My website is: Kompulsa.

This article, Solar Universe Acquires Gen110 To Become “Top Player”, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

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Over 50% Of Electric Cars Sold In US Are In 5 Cities

by Nicholas Brown — Special to JBS News

You have probably heard of certain cities which have particularly high electric car ownership rates, often due to their generous incentives. Can you name which five cities have over 50% of the electric cars sold in the US?

los angeles

Image Credit: Los Angeles via Shutterstock

Here’s the list:

  1. Los Angeles, California
  2. San Francisco, California
  3. New York City
  4. Seattle, Washington
  5. Atlanta, Georgia

Georgia offers a tax credit for electric vehicles that is equal to 20% of the vehicle’s cost, up to a maximum amount of $5,000. California has many charging stations, which might have contributed to its presence in the list above, but it also offers a $2,500 incentive for electric vehicles. (The charging stations may just be in place due to the high electric car ownership in the state… it’s that whole chicken & egg question again.)

New York City has its own EV policies that surely helped stimulate EV adoption a bit, but the fact that it is the largest city in the US (by far) is also surely a factor.

Image Credits: San FranciscoLos Angeles via Shutterstock