Scotland: Renewable Energy Hits 40% of Total Capacity

by Guest Contributor Katie Valentine.

Scotland at 40% renewable energy in 2013
Renewable energy use is at record highs in Scotland at 40% of total demand and on-track to hit 100% renewable energy by 2020.

Originally published on ThinkProgress.

In 2012, Scotland got 40.3 percent of its electricity from renewable sources — up from 36.3 percent in 2011 and just 24.1 percent in 2010. The Scottish government plans to get half of its electricity from renewable energy by 2015, a target it said it was on track to meet — and 100 percent of its electricity by 2020!

Scotland’s renewable energy numbers are much higher than many other UK countries — renewables produced only 8.2 percent of England’s electricity in 2012, and in Wales, 8.7 percent of electricity comes from renewable sources.

“Renewable electricity in Scotland is going from strength to strength, confirming that 2012 was a record year for generation in Scotland and that 2013 looks set to be even better,” said Scotland’s energy minister Fergus Ewing.’

Lang Banks, Director of WWF Scotland, told the BBC that if Scotland is to meet its target of renewable energy generating 100 percent of electricity by 2020, the country will need to invest more in offshore wind.

“In order to remain on target Scotland will need to deploy significant amounts of offshore wind in the near future,” he said. “It’s therefore vital that the UK government gives a stronger signal of its ambition on the growth of offshore wind in Scotland’s seas, as well as the necessary support needed to deliver that growth.”

Wind power is Scotland’s fastest-growing renewable energy source. In 2012, Scotland’s wind power generation jumped by 19 percent. The country is home to the UK’s largest wind farm and constructed its first offshore wind farm in April 2010. The country is also working to harness tidal power and is home to world’s first commercial wave power generator.

Image: Scotland wind turbines via Shutterstock

This article, Renewable Energy Now Has 40% Market Penetration In Scotland, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

100% Renewable Energy Primer + COP 19 100% Renewable Energy Side Event

by Zachary Shahan

COP 19
Image Credit: Solar panel, wind turbine & globe via Shutterstock

Originally published on Planetsave.

At the United Nations’ upcoming COP 19 event in Warsaw, the REN Alliance is scheduled to “introduce the theme of a 100% renewable energy future, and introduce case studies on how to attain this vision.” The side event is supposed to touch on technical integration of renewable energy resources, policies, financing, and more.

Speakers will include Ms. Jennifer McIntosh of the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), Ms. Tracy Lane of the International Hydropower Association (IHA), Ms. Karin Haara of the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), and Mr. Stefan Gsaenger of the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA). I’m sure they will give excellent presentations that are both inspirational and useful. And it is great to see that the REN Alliance has pulled together top global leaders from the four biggest renewable energy sectors.

A 100% renewable energy future is something I have written about several times. First of all, for anyone interested in the subject (and we all should be!), I think it’s worth looking at a number of large studies conducted by researchers at several different universities, governmental agencies, and organizations who have come to very promising conclusions regarding how much renewable energy the world and specific countries could develop at a competitive cost. These studies come to important findings such as:

Seriously, these are must-read summaries of excellent reports on the subject of switching to renewable energy on a large scale. And if you have the time, digging into the actual studies would be even more useful.

It’s also very useful to learn a bit about some of the countries and cities that have completely or almost completely switched to renewable energy for their electricity supply. For example, some leading examples include Iceland, which now gets 100% of its electricity from renewable energy sources; Tokelau, which has hit 100% renewable energy; Denmark, which is now getting nearly 50% of its electricity from renewable energy sources and is planning to get 50% from wind power alone by 2020; Scotland, which is aiming for 100% electricity from renewable energy by 2020; Samsø, a 100% wind-powered island; and Güssing, Austria, which is also already 100% powered by clean, renewable energy.

Another thing worth noting, whether you intend to attend this COP 19 side event or not, is that projections for how much renewable energy will be installed in the coming decades vary widely, but no matter who you ask, renewable energy will grow at a very strong rate. The projections regarding how much renewable energy will be installed vary greatly based on the assumptions made by the researchers, of course, but even before the assumptions come the political goals with which the research team is going into the project – these often shape the assumptions used. No projection in this arena is perfect, and it’s very worthwhile to find out what the assumptions of a study are before referencing it.

Also, lastly, one of the key points of discussion when it comes to how much renewable energy is “possible” is the issue of renewable energy intermittency. I highly recommend reading this article about the fallacy of that intermittency concern – read it, re-read it, and be sure to share it with others. Also, the prequel to that piece was one I wrote about utility company CEO’s who tore down the renewable energy intermittency concern back in 2011 in a utility company CEO roundtable at a solar power conference. That is also a must-read, in my humble opinion.

If you will be at COP 19 and are interested in attending the REN Alliance side event, “Integrated technologies towards 100% renewables: Case studies and ex. on country and regional level,” it is scheduled for 16:45–18:15 on Monday, November 18, in room 1.

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This article, 100% Renewable Energy Primer + COP 19 100% Renewable Energy Side Event, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Zachary Shahan is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy for the past four years or so. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he’s the Network Manager for their parent organization – Important Media – and he’s the Owner/Founder of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.

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Switched On Scotland Aims To Decarbonise Scottish Transport By 2050

by Zachary Shahan — Special to JBS News

Originally published on EV Obsession.

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Photo Credit: twicepix / Foter / CC BY-SA
Photo Credit: twicepix / Foter / CC BY-SA

Scotlandlong a leader in clean, renewable electricity — has now set a plan in motion for an electric vehicle revolution in order to take even better advantage of that clean electricity.

The £14 million ’Switched On Scotland’ plan was officially announced earlier this month, but it actually includes some programs that have been in place for awhile. For example, it includes the UK government’s £5,000 plug-in car grant as well as ChargePlace Scotland, a program that provides a network of recharging points across the country.

The Switched on Scotland plan was developed by leaders in industry, academia, and government.

“Discounted ferry fares for electric vehicles on all routes to Mull and Bute are also being introduced as part of a pilot scheme as a further incentive for people to purchase EVs,” the Transport Scotland press release notes. “Electric vehicles owners will be able to take advantage of a 50% discount on single car tickets.”

Transport Minister Keith Brown said:

“I am delighted to be launching Switched on Scotland which is the result of a strong partnership approach. The Roadmap has been shaped by extensive consultation through our E-cosse partnership and by expert input from our EV Strategic Board.

“This transformation is absolutely vital to achieve our ambitious climate change targets. It will also help improve local air quality with a resultant improvement in public health and wellbeing and contribute toward further energising Scotland’s economy through opportunities for our flourishing green technology industries and our renewable energy sector.”

Gordon McGregor, co-chair of the EV Strategic Board and energy and environment director, Scottish Power added:

“I am delighted to be supporting the launch of ’Switched On Scotland’ today. It offers the potential to move away from our dependence on fossil fuels for transport. The actions it contains can help deliver Scotland’s targets on energy & climate change, make our towns and cities less polluted and offer support to industry through economic development and R&D in support of clean technology markets.”

In addition to the financial and infrastructure support, the program also includes “soft” support. For example, the Scottish government offers expert advice for potential EV owners and will even connect them with existing EV owners and help them to experience EVs first-hand at their local dealerships:

http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/scotland/Travel/Electric-Vehicle-Network.

As a part of that initial education, the press release notes:

“Electric vehicle owners currently pay no road tax and are cheaper to run at 2/3p a mile to power an electric car compared to 16p a mile for the average fossil-fuelled family car. Scottish households that buy an electric vehicle have the added bonus of a 100% grant for a home charging point.”

To read the full ”Switched on Scotland” plan can be viewed here:

http://www.greenerscotland.org/greener-travel/electric-vehicles/electric-vehicles-scotland

Repost.Us - Republish This Article

This article, Switched On Scotland Aims To Decarbonise Scottish Transport By 2050, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Zachary Shahan is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy for the past four years or so. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he’s the Network Manager for their parent organization – Important Media – and he’s the Owner/Founder of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.

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