Wind Power Growth in Emerging Markets Set for Double Digit Rise

by Joshua S Hill

Renewable Energy in Emerging Markets. Navigant research predicts that many established markets will experience flat or single-digit wind power growth over the next few years, while the average compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for wind markets in 10 'Emerging economy' nations -- from 2013 to 2023 -- will be 21.9%.
Renewable Energy in Emerging Markets. Navigant research predicts that many established markets will experience flat or single-digit wind power growth over the next few years, while the average compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for wind markets in 10 ‘Emerging economy’ nations — from 2013 to 2023 — will be 21.9%. Pilot Wind Farm in South Africa. warrenski/Flickr

New research from Navigant research predicts that demand for renewable energy in Africa and the former Soviet Union, as well as across the developed world, will see wind power experience fastest growth in emerging markets.

Several factors are hampering the growth of the market across the developed world, including austerity measures in a number of European countries, and a boom-and-bust cycle in the United States. These halts come at the same time that the emerging world are looking for technologies able to generate enough energy to support their burgeoning populations while at the same time creating less of an environmental impact than traditional generation techniques.

“Amidst the slowdown in the established markets, the demand for wind power in certain emerging markets will make these regions critical to the global wind market,” says Feng Zhao, research director with Navigant Research.

“The opportunities arising in these underserved regions will not only help reduce the exposure of wind turbine manufacturers to ups and downs in the mainstream wind power markets, but will also hold the key for current leading turbine suppliers to maintain their leadership in the future.”

Navigant’s research predicts that many established markets will experience flat or single-digit growth over the next few years, while the average compound annual growth rate for a chosen set of 10 emerging wind markets in Africa and the former Soviet Union from 2013 to 2023 will be 21.9%.

The 10 countries in question are South Africa, Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Ethiopia, Kenya, Ukraine, Russia, and Kazakhstan. A summary of the report can be found on the Navigant Research website.

The emerging world is probably the most likely to benefit most from renewable energies like wind. Russia is the world’s largest country by area, and approximately two-thirds of the country’s hinterland is unreachable by centralised power grids, which means that isolated communities must rely on expensive fuel for power generation. Over time, situations like this will likely be remedied by the spread of wind and solar power, allowing individual communities to find environmentally friendly and economically healthy means to generate their own power.

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This article, Wind Power Growth To Sharpen In Emerging Markets, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Renewable Energy Joshua S HillJoshua S Hill I’m a Christian, a nerd, a geek, a liberal left-winger, and believe that we’re pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I work as Associate Editor for the Important Media Network and write for CleanTechnica and Planetsave. I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), Amazing Stories, the Stabley Times and Medium.   I love words with a passion, both creating them and reading them.

South Africa’s First Utility-Scale Solar Plant Goes Online

South Africa’s First Utility-Scale Solar Plant Goes Online | 23/11/13
by Nicholas Brown

In South Africa, the Kalkbult solar power plant has gone online three months ahead of schedule. It is South Africa’s first utility-scale photovoltaic solar power plant.

Kalkbult solar power plant.Image Credit: Scatec Solar.
Kalkbult solar power plant. Image Credit: Scatec Solar.

It has an electricity generation capacity of 75 MW and consists of 312,000 solar panels. 600 construction jobs were created by the project, 16% of which were allocated to female workers. Construction of the plant began in November 2012, in Petrusville, Northern Cape Province, and was carried out by Scatec Solar, a Norwegian energy company.

The national utility Eksom is to purchase an estimated 135 million kWh per year from the Kalkbult solar power plant via a 20-year power purchase agreement (PPA). The electricity is to cleanly power approximately 33,000 homes, and operate on a piece of leased land from a 105 hectare sheep farm.

I doubt the sheep will mind, as solar panels produce no noise or gases to disrupt them.

The fact that renewable energy can work in harmony with the environment and without disrupting surrounding activities is often overlooked,” said Raymond Carlsen, CEO of Scatec Solar.

After 20 years, we can upgrade the project with the latest technology and continue operations for many years or we can dismantle it and leave the environment in its original natural state.

Kalkbult solar power plant.
Kalkbult solar power plant. Image Credit: Scatec Solar.

This is only 1 of 47 plants awarded PPAs with Eksom under the REIPPP national procurement program, and is a step away from South Africa’s heavy dependence on coal-fired power plants. (South Africa is almost completely dependent on coal power plants at the moment.)

That is an important step towards bettering public health, reduced global warming, and reduced dependence on finite fossil fuels.

Follow me on Twitter @Kompulsa

This article, South Africa’s First Utility-Scale Solar Plant Goes Online, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Nicholas Brown has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, geography, and much more. My website is: Kompulsa

Artist paints tribute to Mr. Nelson Mandela

Accomplished South African artist Salli van Druten took it upon herself to create a project named ‘Thanks for the Colour’ and painted the faces of 95 Nelson Mandela supporters and published their images in a book.
She then presented a copy of the finished book to Mr. Mandela as a gift for his 95th birthday on July 18, 2013.
All proceeds from the sale of copies of the book will go to the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital, in South Africa.

Salli van Druten at work on the "Thanks for the Colour" project.
Salli van Druten at work on the “Thanks for the Colour” project, where she painted portraits of 95 Mr. Nelson Mandela supporters. All proceeds from the book sales will go to the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital. All images are copyrighted by the artist.

Like many others, Salli believes that South Africa’s peaceful transformation from Apartheid to Democracy, and the absence of a civil war, was nothing short of a miracle.

Salli van Druten; “We moved from looking at our world in Black and White to a country exploding with colour. The role that Nelson Mandela played in this miracle, the humility and composure he showed when many around him were losing their heads, elevated him to the role of modern-day Saint.”

Salli wanted to thank Nelson Mandela for what he has done for her country and for the example he has set for the world. Painting portraits are her passion and the use of bold, bright colours seemed to fit the South African “Rainbow Nation” perfectly. What better way to celebrate Madiba’s 95th birthday than to paint 95 portraits of ordinary people in 95 days. Salli set herself the challenge with other people from around the world who feel the same way about Nelson Mandela.

She started a social media campaign and collected faces of 95 people together with their personal messages to Mandela, from 30 countries around the globe, to thank him in a personal way for the rich cultural understanding he has added to our modern civilisation.

She managed to complete all 95 paintings in the nick of time — just a week before Madiba’s birthday. The individual messages of appreciation with the portraits were then published in a book that Salli delivered to the Nelson Mandela Foundation on Tata Madiba’s (Nelson Mandela) 95th Birthday, on 18 July 2013.

Thanks for the Colour! Book and portraits by artist Salli van Druten. Proceeds from the sales will go to the Nelson Mandela Children's Hospital in South Africa.
Thanks for the Colour! — By renowned South African artist Salli van Druten. I was pleased and honoured to be one of the people chosen for Salli’s great work. My image and comment appears on the left page in this image. All images are copyrighted by the artist.
Collage of the 95 faces chosen by the artist. All images copyrighted by the artist.
Collage of the 95 faces chosen by the artist. All images copyrighted by the artist.
Book-Covers
The completed book by artist Salli van Druten. All images are copyrighted by the artist.

The Economics of Green Energy

by John Brian Shannon

Back in the old days of sustainable energy, circa 2000, the cost of switching to solar or wind was so expensive that only the well-intentioned considered it — and only the wealthy could afford it.

How times have changed!

Nowadays, utility-scale solar power and wind power are cost-competitive with utility-scale coal-fired and nuclear electrical power generation.

And obviously, solar and wind are much better for the environment.

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That’s not to knock coal, which has provided reliable power for decades and still has a great future in Coal to Liquid fuels — that is, coal processed into extremely pure transportation fuels. Gasoline for your car, diesel for cars, trucks and ships and jet fuel are all created from coal using CTL technology.

South Africa’s SASOL have been using CTL technology successfully since 1955 and 30% of all the transportation fuels in that country are made from domestically-sourced coal. No alterations to vehicle engines or aircraft turbine engines are required to use fuels which are made from coal — as the CTL technology produces almost laboratory-quality fuels when using the Fisher-Tropsch catalytic process.

However, electrical power generation which burns raw coal releases billions of tons of CO2 and carbon monoxide, along with huge amounts of hydrogen sulfide, arsenic, lead, cyanide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide and other toxins into the atmosphere every year — all of which easily cross state lines, national boundaries and even the oceans before settling in both populated areas and farmland.

One brand new coal-fired plant per week is completed and goes into service in China these days and this has been the case since late 2008.

In 2010 for example, China operated 620 coal-fired power plants which burned over 3 billion tons of coal per year. Just the CO2 emissions alone from coal-fired electrical generation in China surpassed 7.2 billion tons in 2010.

Which leads to higher health care costs in both the developing world and the developed world. According to CLPmag.org

“China faces a number of serious environmental issues caused by overpopulation and rapid industrial growth. Water pollution and a resulting shortage of drinking water is one such issue, as is air pollution caused by an over-reliance on coal as fuel. It has been estimated that 410,000 Chinese die as a result of pollution each year.”

In addition to being cost-competitive with coal, solar and wind are also cost-competitive with nuclear. In the case of solar and wind power there is no need for very costly nuclear spent-fuel storage — as some types of nuclear fuel rods must be stored in terrorist-proof bunkers and be constantly-cooled 24 hours per day/365 days per year for up to 20,000 years — without any interruption lasting longer than 36 hours. The cost of just one failure here would be catastrophic.

solar-less-expensive-nuclear_thumb[3]

Nuclear power has been statistically safe – with only one serious incident about every ten years on average. However, we have seen deaths caused by exposure to radioactive emissions from nuclear power plant accidents and indirect adverse health effects on population centres near nuclear disaster sites. Some particles remain radioactive at toxic levels for many decades.

Which leads to higher health care costs in many nations as the wind can carry radioactive particulate thousands of miles — just as it can carry toxic gasses and soot from coal-fired power generation for thousands of miles.

For the most recent example of the cost to clean up nuclear accidents, the Fukushima disaster had been estimated at between $15 – 45 billion dollars, but more recently a $50 – 100 billion dollar price-tag has appeared and full decommissioning may take until 2030 to complete. The Japanese government is covering all the costs of decommissioning the Fukushima nuclear site — which means Japanese citizens will end up paying the full cost through taxation.

From the perspective of taxpayers everywhere who bear the brunt of health care costs and disaster mitigation, the full cost of a given kind of fuel must include the costs of all adverse health effects, deaths, damages and lost productivity caused by each kind of fuel.

Which is why solar, wind and biomass are still the better deal by far – even at the same per-gigawatt price.

John Brian Shannon writes about green energy, sustainable development and economics from British Columbia, Canada. His articles appear in the Arabian Gazette, EcoPoint Asia, EnergyBoom, the Huffington Post, the United Nations Development Programme – and other quality publications.

John believes it is important to assist all levels of government and the business community to find sustainable ways forward for industry and consumers.

Check out his green energy blog at: http://johnbrianshannon.com

Check out his economics blog at: https://jbsnews.wordpress.com

Follow John on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/#!/JBSCanada