The Tesla Model S Is Almost Maintenance Free

by Nicholas Brown – Special to JBS News

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Image Credit: Tesla

Electric vehicles are different from gasoline-powered vehicles in many ways. However, mainstream debates tend to focus on only a few of those differences, such as the initial cost of electric vehicles, their range, and the fuel efficiency of gasoline-powered vehicles.

For example, they rarely factor in the reliability or durability of electric vehicles. This may be due to the fact that the main motive electrification is the reduction of petroleum usage. And, of course, opponents of electric vehicles don’t like to mention their many other positive qualities.

The Tesla Model S actually requires little to no maintenance compared to gasoline-powered vehicles, due to the fact that it has very few mechanical parts that can malfunction. The only parts that require regular replacement are windshield wipers and tires. Brake pads will require replacement as well, but not nearly as often as those in gasoline-powered vehicles, since they are used much less thanks to regenerative braking.

Regenerative braking takes over some of the braking work, giving the brake pads a… break, and it does so without additional generators.

An electric propulsion system’s mechanical parts consist of the propulsion motor, the fans in the speed controller, radiator fans, a coolant pump (if there is a liquid cooling system), and that’s it.

But wait, don’t electric vehicles require more electronics?

They actually require fewer electronics than gasoline-powered vehicles, as a typical electric propulsion system contains the following semiconductor electronics:

  1. Speed controller.
  2. Inverter.
  3. Battery management system.
  4. Electrical, non-semiconductor parts include coolant pumps and fans.

Gasoline propulsion systems contain a longer list of them, including, but not limited to:

  1. Electronic actuators to adjust various valves.
  2. Ignition system.
  3. Throttle controls.
  4. Turbochargers (only in some models).
  5. Engine control unit.
  6. Transmission control unit.
  7. Oxygen sensor.
  8. Coolant pump.
  9. Fuel pump.
  10. Oil pump.
  11. Engine fan.
  12. Transmission oil cooler pump (only in some models).

Mechanical parts in gas propulsion systems which can fail include, but are not limited to:

  1. Transmission.
  2. Valves.
  3. Spark plugs.
  4. Crankshaft.
  5. Connecting Rod.
  6. Cylinders.
  7. Camshaft.
  8. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system.
  9. Belt and pulley systems for driving the alternator, engine fan, and other parts.

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This article, The Tesla Model S Is Almost Maintenance Free, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Nicholas Brown has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, geography, and much more. My website is: Kompulsa.

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GM Working On $30,000, 200-Mile EV That Could Compete With Tesla Model E

by Important Media Cross-Post

Editor’s notes: Assumption is that Tesla’s affordable, 2017 EV will be called the Tesla Model E; Tesla’s use of lithium-ion batteries (a different kind than used in laptops) will not result in a worldwide shortage of such batteries (video on that coming soon). Now, here’s Chris DeMorro’s post from Gas2.

Tesla’s incredible sales success has automakers the world over wondering how to counter the Silicon Valley automaker, and General Motors could have the answer. GM is developing a 200-mile electric car with a targeted sales price of $30,000, right in the same sweet spot Elon Musk is aiming for. But who will launch first?

GM has already hinted that it is developing a line of Tesla-rivaling EVs, one with a 100-mile range and the other with 200-miles of range per charge. Elon Musk’s goal is to launch a $30,000, 200-mile electric car by 2017 at the latest. While GM hasn’t put a timetable on the launch of its own Tesla fighter, executives have said the technology exists; it’s just the price point that remains a sticky issue.

To date GM’s only pure electric car is the Spark EV, which has been surprisingly well-received, though it is for sale only in a handful of markets for now. It also has just 82 miles of range per charge, well short of Tesla’s entry-level Model S which boasts up to 208 miles of range as well as a $70,000 price tag.

But whereas Tesla needs to launch the Model X SUV next, GM is free to concentrate on an affordable competitor that might even reach the road first. It just comes down to price, with automakers stuck paying twice as much or more for their battery packs. Tesla’s use of laptop batteries (which could soon lead to a worldwide shortage) means their batteries are substantially cheaper than the batteries used in the Chevy Volt. Speaking of which, may I suggest returning to the original Volt concept (above) for design inspiration?

GM will have to overcome that price hurdle, or else sell its electric vehicles at a loss, in order to compete with Tesla. It only has about four-years to do it, though. Is GM capable of fighting Tesla on its own turf? Or will another automaker steal the show?

Source: Wall St. Journal

This article, GM Working On $30,000, 200-Mile EV That Could Compete With Tesla Model E, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Important Media Cross-PostCleanTechnica is one of 18 blogs in the Important Media blog network. With a bit of overlap in coverage, we sometimes repost some of the great content published by our sister sites.

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Tesla Model S Could Consume 100% Of World’s Laptop Batteries

Originally published on Gas2 by Christopher DeMorro

With production of the Tesla Model S set to exceed 20,000 units in its first year, analysts are now looking forward to the next fiscal year. Many are bullish that Tesla can meet its 40,000 unit production capacity with ease, which raises a worrying issue; a shortage of laptop battery cells.

Unlike many other electric cars, the Tesla Model S uses around 7,000 18650 lithium-ion laptop battery cells from Panasonic. [CleanTechnica Editor’s Note: Tesla is also likely to start buying batteries from Samsung.]

It also has the largest battery pack at 85 kWh than any other EV out there, meaning that in a single year Tesla has sent shockwaves through the laptop battery business.

If Tesla hits its 40,000 unit mark next year, laptop battery production will essentially have to double to keep up with demand. Beyond that, Tesla is already looking into production facilities in Europe and Asia, and production could potentially hit 100,000 units or more by the end of the decade. What will happen to the cost of laptop batteries?

More like than not the prices of batteries, computers, and electric will continue to plummet, and there is little doubt that the industry can keep up. Is Tesla the tipping point for electric cars?

Source: Green Car Reports

This article, Tesla Model S Could Consume 100% Of World’s Laptop Batteries, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

Elon Musk To Drive Tesla Model S Across America In Six Days

by Important Media Cross-Post

Originally published on Gas2
By Christopher DeMorro.

tesla-supercharger-stop

The Tesla Model S has defied even the wildest expectations, shooting Tesla Motors stock into the stratosphere and increasing the profile of Elon Musk exponentially. So now is the perfect time for Musk to embark on a great American road trip. Musk claims that during a six-day road trip from Los Angeles to New York City, the Tesla Model S will spend just 9 hours charging.

Musk tweeted about the trip late last week, with details having been finalized. The trip will no doubt showcase Tesla’s network of Supercharger stations, which have been slowly cropping up along America’s coast. But America’s heartland is devoid of Superchargers, so how Musk plans to spend just 9 hours recharging at Tesla-exclusive charging station has me scratching my head.

The 3,200 mile journey will require a minimum of 11 refills, even if Musk manages to wrangle 300 miles per-charge. Musk claims that they will spend just 1.5 hours a day recharging, the same amount of time they would spend at rest stops or tourist attractions.

Fair enough, but Tesla’s own Supercharge map shows wide swaths of the country remain uncovered. Am I missing something here? Probably. I know enough not to doubt Elon Musk when he says he is going to do something.

Source: Elon Musk’s Twitter

This article, Elon Musk To Drive Tesla Model S Across America In Six Days, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

Tesla Hits Europe — New Assembly Plant In Holland, The Netherlands

by Nathan – Special to JBS News

Originally published on CleanTechnica sister site Ecopreneurist.

Tesla’s first assembly plant on the European continent is now open for business! The Tilburg Assembly Plant — located in the Netherlands, only about 50 miles from the port of Rotterdam — will now serve as the final assembly and distribution point for all Model S vehicles sold on the European continent. The plant will also function as Tesla’s European service and parts headquarters.

The 18,900 m2 assembly plant will now receive nearly complete Model S units shipped over from the US for final assembly before being delivered to customers throughout the European market.

Image Credit: Tesla Motors
Image Credit: Tesla Motors

Green Car Congress has more:

Being centrally located in Tilburg enables efficient, timely and cost effective operations throughout Europe, Tesla says. Parts can be distributed to anywhere across the continent within 12 hours. Tilburg, about 80 km (50 miles) from the port of Rotterdam, is connected by an excellent rail and motorway network to all major markets.

Some of the very first Dutch, Belgian, French and German Model S customers received their cars today at the brand new facility.

On a related note — and as I’m sure you already know — deliveries of the Model S to European customers began in Norway towards the beginning of August.

With expanding demand in Europe as well as the US, it seems Tesla is needing to diversify it suppliers. There is also word that it is going to start buying batteries from Samsung as well as Panasonic.

English: Tesla Model S Prototype at the 2009 F...
English: Tesla Model S Prototype at the 2009 Frankfurt Motor Show (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article, Tesla Hits Europe — New Assembly Plant In Holland, The Netherlands, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

For the fate of the sons of men and the fate of beasts is the same; as one dies, so dies the other. They all have the same breath, and man has no advantage over the beasts; for all is vanity. – Ecclesiastes 3:19