Wind Power Growth in Emerging Markets Set for Double Digit Rise

by Joshua S Hill

Renewable Energy in Emerging Markets. Navigant research predicts that many established markets will experience flat or single-digit wind power growth over the next few years, while the average compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for wind markets in 10 'Emerging economy' nations -- from 2013 to 2023 -- will be 21.9%.
Renewable Energy in Emerging Markets. Navigant research predicts that many established markets will experience flat or single-digit wind power growth over the next few years, while the average compound annual growth rate (CAGR) for wind markets in 10 ‘Emerging economy’ nations — from 2013 to 2023 — will be 21.9%. Pilot Wind Farm in South Africa. warrenski/Flickr

New research from Navigant research predicts that demand for renewable energy in Africa and the former Soviet Union, as well as across the developed world, will see wind power experience fastest growth in emerging markets.

Several factors are hampering the growth of the market across the developed world, including austerity measures in a number of European countries, and a boom-and-bust cycle in the United States. These halts come at the same time that the emerging world are looking for technologies able to generate enough energy to support their burgeoning populations while at the same time creating less of an environmental impact than traditional generation techniques.

“Amidst the slowdown in the established markets, the demand for wind power in certain emerging markets will make these regions critical to the global wind market,” says Feng Zhao, research director with Navigant Research.

“The opportunities arising in these underserved regions will not only help reduce the exposure of wind turbine manufacturers to ups and downs in the mainstream wind power markets, but will also hold the key for current leading turbine suppliers to maintain their leadership in the future.”

Navigant’s research predicts that many established markets will experience flat or single-digit growth over the next few years, while the average compound annual growth rate for a chosen set of 10 emerging wind markets in Africa and the former Soviet Union from 2013 to 2023 will be 21.9%.

The 10 countries in question are South Africa, Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Ethiopia, Kenya, Ukraine, Russia, and Kazakhstan. A summary of the report can be found on the Navigant Research website.

The emerging world is probably the most likely to benefit most from renewable energies like wind. Russia is the world’s largest country by area, and approximately two-thirds of the country’s hinterland is unreachable by centralised power grids, which means that isolated communities must rely on expensive fuel for power generation. Over time, situations like this will likely be remedied by the spread of wind and solar power, allowing individual communities to find environmentally friendly and economically healthy means to generate their own power.

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This article, Wind Power Growth To Sharpen In Emerging Markets, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

Renewable Energy Joshua S HillJoshua S Hill I’m a Christian, a nerd, a geek, a liberal left-winger, and believe that we’re pretty quickly directing planet-Earth into hell in a handbasket! I work as Associate Editor for the Important Media Network and write for CleanTechnica and Planetsave. I also write for Fantasy Book Review (.co.uk), Amazing Stories, the Stabley Times and Medium.   I love words with a passion, both creating them and reading them.

Just for you! A little Sunshine

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About the Author

Zachary Shahan is the director of CleanTechnica, the most popular cleantech-focused website in the world, and Planetsave, a world-leading green and science news site. He has been covering green news of various sorts since 2008, and he has been especially focused on solar energy, electric vehicles, and wind energy for the past four years or so. Aside from his work on CleanTechnica and Planetsave, he’s the Network Manager for their parent organization – Important Media – and he’s the Owner/Founder of Solar Love, EV Obsession, and Bikocity. To connect with Zach on some of your favorite social networks, go to ZacharyShahan.com and click on the relevant buttons.

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Top 20 Utility Scale Solar Countries Graph Of The Day

by Giles Parkinson – Special to JBS News

This article originally published on RenewEconomy

The latest update of utility scale solar developments round the world shows that the US has just joined China as the second country to have installed more than 3 GW of “big solar” and will soon be joined by Germany.

But Australia still does not make the big solar top 20 list compiled by Wiki-Solar – although countries such as Ukraine, Portugal, Thailand, the Czech Republic, Peru, Romania and Bulgaria do.

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[Although there are thousands of small rooftop installations in the country] Australia has only one utility-scale solar installation at present — the Greenough River solar farm in WA — that meets the 10MW qualification for inclusion in the table, although four other projects are due to be built over the next two years. One, the 20MW Royalla project, reached financial close last week and will be the first to obtain bank finance in the country.

Two others are to be built in the ACT under that government’s solar auction program and the other, the 155MW AGL Energy project at Broken Hill and Nyngan, will begin construction next year.

Wiki-Solar says it is thinking of redefining the cut-off for “big solar” to 5MW, given that many projects in Germany and other countries are being built in that range.

If that were to happen,  China, Germany and the USA would still be the only three countries in the 3-4GW range, and India and Spain would rank next with between 1 and 2GW. It would double the number of projects world wide to be included in the table, but would not change Australia’s ranking. It doesn’t have any projects between 1.5MW and 1.0MW either.

This article, Top 20 Utility Scale Solar Countries – Graph Of The Day, is syndicated from Clean Technica and is posted here with permission.

About the Author

is the founding editor of RenewEconomy.com.au, an Australian-based website that provides news and analysis on cleantech, carbon, and climate issues. Giles is based in Sydney and is watching the (slow, but quickening) transformation of Australia’s energy grid with great interest.

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